I WANT THE CENSOR BOARD TO FRAME HER RIGHT

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Read Our Letter

About the Campaign

There are many reasons violence against women continues in our society, and many ways in which each of us can start to bring this violence to an end. We'd like to start with what we love most: our cinema.

To be clear, as artists, writers and entertainers, we work hard to uphold the freedom of expression - but we do also believe every parent and child has a right to make an informed choice before they view scenes that are violent or degrading to women.

A new, more gender-sensitized cinema that places women in positive -- rather than exploited and exploitable roles -- will be a welcome change. However, violence against women didn't start with the cinema and it won't end there, which is why we also need to work hard to challenge the unjust and unequal conditions that make that violence possible.

Through our tools, engagements, interventions, as well as the support of our partner NGOs, the Frame Her Right campaign aims to both challenge those conditions and help women gain access to health care, education, and economic opportunity.

Please join us for the ride. Power to the woman!

The Frame Her Right campaign is an initiative of Half The Sky Movement.

Who We are

The Frame Her Right campaign is an initiative of the Half the Sky Movement, supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

About Half the Sky Movement

The Half the Sky Movement cuts across platforms to ignite the change needed to put an end to the oppression of women and girls worldwide, the defining issue of our time. Inspired by journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's book of the same name, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide brings together video, websites, games, blogs and other educational tools to not only raise awareness of women's issues, but to also provide concrete steps to fight these problems and empower women. Change is possible, and you can be part of the solution.

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide includes a four-hour film broadcast in the United States and abroad, shot in 10 countries: Cambodia, Kenya, India, Sierra Leone, Somaliland, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and the U.S. Traveling with intrepid reporter Nicholas Kristof and A-list celebrity advocates America Ferrera, Diane Lane, Eva Mendes, Meg Ryan, Gabrielle Union and Olivia Wilde, the series introduces women and girls who are living under some of the most difficult circumstances imaginable — and fighting bravely to change them. Their intimate, dramatic and immediate stories of struggle reflect viable and sustainable options for empowerment and offer an actionable blueprint for transformation.

FAQ

The lack of personal freedoms, limited access to education and healthcare, and the absence of economic and physical security make India one of the most unsafe places on the planet for women. This must change. We need an urgent reframing of women in our culture, society, economy and politics. An important national discussion (and many personal ones) needs to take place around the issues of women’s rights, security and empowerment.

The influence of cinema on culture and society is both widespread and deep-rooted. However, violence against women didn't start with cinema and it won't end there. That's why, in addition to challenging how women are framed in popular culture, our campaign also aims to confront the attitudes and underlying values at the level of the family, the school, the workplace. When our role models change - on-screen or off-screen - our accepted behaviors change.

To be clear, as artists, writers and entertainers, we work hard to uphold and defend our creative freedoms. Our aim is not to define what should or should not go into cinema. Our aim is to allow people to make an informed choice before they - more importantly their children - are exposed to violence against women in cinema.

Quite simply, the label on the bottle should say what's in the bottle: the Censor Board must provide an advisory on films containing violence against women.

There is now consensus that exposure to media violence is linked to actual violent behaviour - a link found by many scholars to be on par with the correlation of exposure to second-hand smoke and the risk of lung cancer.

Quite simply, the label on the bottle should say what's in the bottle: the Censor Board must provide an advisory on films containing violence against women.

Please see:

Violence against women is the symptom, not the disease. We cannot, therefore, simply rid society of violence against women without addressing the underlying injustices and inequality that make that violence possible. We cannot simply rid our streets of violence by increasing surveillance and profiling everyone suspicious. Rather than overly-simplistic, knee-jerk and often short-sighted solutions, we need to work towards creating a world where all women are equipped with equal rights. Which means, quite simply, a world where each woman and girl has the choices that are considered inalienable for men: participating in politics, getting an education, having an income, access to healthcare, and living in a society free from violence and discrimination.

We need a more enlightened cinema, by all means. But what we need more is a big change in how people think. Our campaign hopes to play an important role in that big change.

We are part of the Indian film industry, the part that has a conscience and kids. As parents and film-lovers, we would like our children to be exposed to more positive portrayals of women rather than the exploited and exploitable stereotypes that persist in our cinema. This thinking and these values must continually reflect in our work, of course, but the buck ultimately stops with the Censor Board. If they can draw up and circulate a dhobi-list of English and vernacular profanities that cannot be used in future cinema, if they can put a warning on every smoking scene, surely they can put an advisory on films that show women getting beaten up.

It is one thing to be dissatisfied with how our world is, quite another to imagine how we would like our world to be. While our campaign focuses on what's wrong, we'd like your help in promoting what's right - an alternative narrative that is truer to women's rights, security and empowerment. Learn more about the Big Issues and please engage with us on the many ways forward.

The Frame Her Right campaign is an initiative of the Half The Sky Movement. Inspired by journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's book of the same name, Half The Sky brings together video, websites, games, blogs and other educational tools to not only raise awareness of women's issues, but to also provide concrete steps to fight these problems and empower women.